June 15, 2017. Safety in Numbers

These are the names of the twelve apostles: first, Simon, also known as Peter, and his brother Andrew; James son of Zebedee, and his brother John; Philip and Bartholomew; Thomas and Matthew the tax collector; James son of Alphaeus, and Thaddaeus; Simon the Cananaean, and Judas Iscariot, the one who betrayed him. (Matthew 10:2-4)

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June 4, 2017. The Church’s Pagan Problem

During a road trip with a broken CD player, the only radio stations we could pick up were “country” or “Christian”. The rule was we had to stay on that station until it faded out….

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May 25. The Human Need for Division

Jesus’ words to The Father: “That they may all be one” barely leave his lips before they are disproven by the world. Judas betrays him, Peter denies him; the disciples are thrown into disunion.

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April 13, 2017: The cross did not have to happen.

How do you think about Good Friday? Is Jesus’ death an unfortunate accident? Did Jesus die on the cross to atone for the sins of the whole world, past, present and to come? Was he a scapegoat who carried our sins for us and, by dying, took those sins away? How could God stand idly

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April 12, 2017. A New Commandment

“Maundy” Thursday in the Episcopal Church and other Anglican churches is the beginning of a three-day recalling and retelling of the foundations of our faith. The retelling starts with the last supper, then moves to the Crucifixion, and then finishes with the Passover of the Lord at the Great Vigil of Easter. It is one liturgy spanning three days. A truly awe inspiring time in the church year.

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April 7, 2017. Palm Sunday: The Ashes of Human Ambition

How many of you know that the ashes put on our foreheads on Ash Wednesday come from burned palms that were used at the liturgy for the last Palm Sunday? Those ashes call us to repentance, but what are repenting?

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March 27, 2017.  Evening prayer during Holy Week

Morning and Evening Prayer were originally conceived in the Book of Common Prayer as the primary services for each day, including Sunday. It is based on a monastic practice of keeping the hours. Thomas Cranmer, ever the monastic, incorporated Morning and Evening prayer (“Matins” and “Vespers”) as the standard form of worship for the Church in England.

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March 20, 2017. The importance of Holy Week

While Christmas may get more hype and attention these days, Holy Week was celebrated for centuries before the Feast of the Nativity. The ritual celebration of Our Lord’s triumphal entrance into Jerusalem, the celebration of the first Eucharist and the “Novum Maundatum”, the “New Mandate” to “Love others as you have loved me” at the foot washing, from the hearing of the passion Jesus and recitation of the collect at Good Friday pleading with God to set the cross and passion of His son between His judgment and our souls and then the next night saying the ancient prayers and lessons of the Passover of the Lord in darkness and the proclamation of Easter sung amidst blinding light, bells and hymnody for The Great Vigil of Easter, provides for us a way to experience God in a way like no other.

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Week 3.   The dream

I do not regularly get dreams or visions. I’m more of a rational, concrete evidence kind of guy. So, when God visits in that thin spiritual place between sleeping and waking, between dark and dawn, between the spiritual and the concrete, I tend to pay attention.

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Week 2.    Heritage: The Rear View Mirror

A Gary Larson cartoon once had a picture of a gigantic eye framed by the rear view mirror of a car. The caption read “Objects in mirror are larger than they appear.” A friend had of mine had this message printed and taped to the bathroom mirrors at his church: “Objects in mirror are smaller than they appear.” As we all know from crime and courtroom dramas on TV and movies, what one sees is open to interpretation.

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Week 1.    In the beginning

I am Father Ed Hunt, and I will be working with you during this interim time so that your next Rector will enter a parish which is focused, healthy, and committed to a shared future.

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